Green Drinks: Development of the Lentor (Tagore) Forest

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For June, we look at the Lentor (Tagore) Forest, which is slated for housing development. A secondary forest, this space is home to nationally and globally threatened mammals such as the Sunda Pangolin, Banded-Leaf Monkey and Sunda Slow Loris, endangered and vulnerable plants, as well as naturally and globally threatened birds.

Speaking this month, we have Dr Ho Hua Chew, a member of the Executive Committee of the Nature Society (Singapore), working mainly within the Conservation Committee. Also, Primatologist Andie Ang will be in the audience to answer any primate-related queries.

Dr Ho will present a summary of  Nature Society’s position paper with on the ecological/biodiversity assets of the forest.

Date: 29 June 2016 (Wed)
Time: 7pm – 9pm+
Venue: SingJazz Club, 101 Jalan Sultan, #02-00, The Sultan.
Admission: Free (contributions to society accepted)
RSVP: Via Facebook or email greendrinkssingapore@gmail.com

See you there!

About Dr Ho

Dr Ho Hua Chew is a member of the Executive Committee of the Nature Society (Singapore), working mainly on the conservation front on behalf of the Society for about two decades.
 
As past Chairman of the Society’s Conservation Committee, he was involved with the formulation of the Society’s conservation proposals for such areas as Sungei Buloh, Kranji Marshes, etc., as well as the Master Plan for the Conservation of Nature in Singapore (1990).
 
Currently, he continues helping in co-ordinating the Society’s conservation activities & projects, such as feedbacks to government land-use & development plans, biodiversity surveys, etc.
 
Education: MSc in Landscape Ecology, Design & Management (Imperial College); MSc in Applied Ecology and Conservation (University of East Anglia); Ph.D in Philosophy (University of Washington).

About Andie Ang

Andie Ang is the founder of Primate Watching online resource (www.primatewatching.com) and a member of the IUCN Primate Specialist Group. Having completed a M.Sc. on the ecology and conservation of Singapore’s banded leaf monkeys, she is now studying endangered primate species in Vietnam for her doctoral dissertation at the University of Colorado Boulder.
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Upcoming Event: The Green Heart inside the Red Dot

Nominated Member of Parliament Faizah Jamal kicks off the evening by giving a short introduction on the background of the Cross Island Line through the Central Catchment Nature Reserve issue, making references to the Population White Paper Land Use Plan. She will also talk about the engagement between nature groups and the Land Transport Authority (LTA) on this issue.

Tony O’Dempsey will be speaking about the importance of preserving our natural heritage through the Nature Reserves. He will be discussing what is so special about the Central Catchment Nature reserve and how it is more than just “green Space”. Tony will talk in detail about the various threats to our native habitats including the current issue of the Cross Island Line proposed by the LTA as part of its 2013 Master Plan.

Also we’ve heard how an arborist is a ‘protector’ of trees and many of them work for a particular government agency. What does Goh Mia Chun as an arborist do in his tree consultancy firm and what is his role in protecting trees? Find out more…

Date: 23 October 2013 (Wednesday)
Time: 6.30pm  onwards
Venue: The Hub, National Youth Council Academy, 113 Somerset Road
RSVP: Email us at greendrinkssingapore@gmail.com or register at https://www.facebook.com/events/436157453159421/?fref=ts

We hope you can join us!

About our speakers

Faizah Jamal

For more than 25 years, Faizah Jamal has been an advocate for the environment, which started with her forays into the Malaysian forests and the volcanoes in Indonesia as a member of the (then) Malayan Nature Society now known as the Nature Society Singapore.

Formerly a Corporate Lawyer with a law degree from NUS, Faizah had specialized in Intellectual Property Law with top law firms Drew & Napier and Haq & Selvam in Singapore.
Faizah is also a recipient of the European Community (now European Union) Post-graduate Scholarship for ASEAN nationals in Environment Studies in 1992, and has a Master’s degree in Environment Law from King’s College, University of London.

In 2003 Faizah gave up corporate law to pursue her passion for the environment and embarked on a second career as a full time Environment Educator, leading students towards an awareness of, and love for Nature.

Since 2008, Faizah is an Adjunct Lecturer with Republic Polytechnic, pioneering the Environment Education module , where she not only guides young people to be eco–literate, through skillful facilitation, she also encourages her students to reflect deeply on the intangible lessons from Nature in leading examined lives.

In Feb 2012 Faizah was appointed as a Nominated Member of Parliament, after her successful nomination by Nature Society Singapore specifically to represent environment concerns in Parliament.

Most notably, Faizah voted against the White Paper in Parliament in Feb 2013, charging that it is a document that thinks only ‘with the head, and not with the heart’. In particular, she had questioned the government’s plans to build an MRT line cutting through the Central Catchment Nature Reserve and had been vocal in expressing her views against it.

Tony O’Dempsey

Tony is a current council member of the Nature Society (Singapore) and former chair of its Vertebrate Study Group. He is also the author ofwww.florasingapura.com. Tony has been working as a volunteer on various conservation projects relating to the Nature Reserves for the past 20 years and is very familiar with the forest habitats of the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. He is also the principle editor of the NSS Position paper on the Cross Island Line.

TODAY: Culling of Lower Peirce wild pigs ‘necessary in the short term’

TODAY reported that the Nature Society (Singapore) has come up with long-term measures to reduce culling of wild pigs in the future, even though for the shorter term it recommends culling of significant numbers. The society rejected sterilisation, translocation and erection of barriers are inadequate measures to curb the wild pig population, while starting a survey to see if there is correlation between pig densities and abundance of oil palm in the area.

Culling of Lower Peirce wild pigs ‘necessary in the short term’

SINGAPORE – Even as it recommended that the wild pig population at Lower Peirce needed to be “substantially reduced immediately”, the Nature Society has suggested longer-term measures to minimise future culling.

These include fencing off the oil palm forest at the south-east section of the Lower Peirce forest to deny the pigs access to this food source, the removal of oil palm and a study to determine optimum wild pig populations for the Central Catchment Nature Reserve.

In the short term, culling is necessary to stop the forest from being denuded and to allow for regeneration.

It would also ensure sufficient resources for other wildlife such as mousedeer, stop native species like insects and the Malayan box terrapin from being preyed on by the pigs, and improve public safety, the society said in its position paper issued last week.

It identified a 0.3-sq-km area in the Lower Peirce forest – close to Upper Thomson Road – as being severely damaged by two families of between 30 and 40 wild pigs, with a new batch of 10 piglets observed last month.

This means a density of 266 pigs a sq km at the site or over seven times the density of Malaysia’s Pasoh forest, where large wild pig populations adversely impact small animals and flora.

Sterilisation will not solve the problem of overpopulation, while erecting barriers to keep the pigs within the forest is impractical and would not address forest degeneration, the society said.

Translocation would only transfer the problem to another area.

The society is involved in a survey to determine if high wild pig densities are correlated to the presence of oil palm in the area.

As a conservation group, it is not qualified to recommend how culling should be carried out, it added.

Debate on the culling of wild pigs started in June, with animal welfare activists against it and the National Parks Board defending its decision.

On June 22, two wild boars wandered into the Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park and one attacked a security guard and a five-year-old boy.

Image from Savio DSouza