TODAY: New toilet turns human waste into resources

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) scientists have developed a toilet that converts human waste for use as fertiliser and biogas. TODAY reports.

New toilet turns human waste into resources

SINGAPORE – Scientists from the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed a new toilet system that converts human waste to electricity and fertiliser.

It also reduces the amount of water needed for flushing by up to 90 per cent, compared to current toilet systems in Singapore.

Dubbed the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet, the system has two chambers which separate liquid and solid wastes.

Using vacuum suction technology, flushing liquids takes only 0.2 litre of water while flushing solids requires only one litre. Existing toilets use four to six litres of water per flush.

Liquid waste will be diverted to a processing facility where components used for fertilisers can be recovered, while solid waste is sent to a bioreactor to release bio-gas which contains methane. Methane can be used in stoves or be converted to electricity.

“Singapore has been relatively clean over the last few decades, but we can still improve a little bit,” said Associate Professor Wang Jing-Yuan, Director of NTU’s Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre. “In Singapore we don’t have natural resources, that is why we’ve been thinking if we can use all these waste materials. To me, all these are resources.”

Scientists have been working on the system since 2010. The system is part of a project that has received S$10 million from Singapore’s National Research Foundation’s Competitive Research Programme.

The NTU plans to carry out a six-month trial starting next month, with prototypes installed in two toilets in the university and used by an estimated 500 students.

Talks are also underway to test bed the project in a new town in two years’ time. Scientists further hope to commercialise the system and export it to other countries.

Image from Sean.Caco

Advertisements
Comments
One Response to “TODAY: New toilet turns human waste into resources”
  1. Ricky Yad says:

    QUAVAC (The Netherlands) has been the market leader of vacuum technology for wastewater disposal for decades. QUAVAC has patented this technology under the name Vacuflow®. Wastewater is transported to the vacuum station by means of aspirated air using negative pressure. Compared to the traditional natural gravity and pressure system sewerage methods Vacuflow­® has several advantages. It is easy in maintenance, environmentally friendly, easily expandable and blockage is impossible.
    Moreover, Vacuflow® sewerage is often applied in certain situations where no other system is possible. Such sites include marinas, harbour, islands, rural areas and industrial areas.

    QUAVAC provides free quotes for vacuum sewer design and visit
    http://bit.ly/NXnlM1

    Name: Ricky YD
    Vacuum Sewer Engineer
    Netherlands/Germany/India

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

  • About Green Drinks Singapore

    Founded in November 2007, Green Drinks Singapore is one of more than 800 cities with a Green Drinks presence.

  • We are a non-profit environmental movement that connects academia, green businesses, activists, community and government, for knowledge sharing and collaboration opportunities. We do this by organising informal talks every last Thursday of the month, over drinks! Once in a while, we hold discussions, documentary screenings and workshops to further engage the public and participants.
  • Started in 1989 in London, the Green Drinks movement is a self-organising network that is meant to be simple and unstructured. The global site can be found at www.greendrinks.org.
%d bloggers like this: