Channel NewsAsia: Thousands of dead fish seen at Pasir Ris riverbank

Thousands of small dead fish were found at Sungei Api Api today, NEA is conducting investigations.

Channel NewsAsia reports.

Thousands of dead fish seen at Pasir Ris riverbank

SINGAPORE: Residents living near Sungei Api Api in Pasir Ris were hit by a stinker, after thousands of dead small fish were swept up the banks of the river.

The dead fish were first spotted at the mouth of the river and along the beach at Pasir Ris on Tuesday morning.

National water agency PUB was informed of the spectacle, and workers were seen scooping up the dead fish and disposing them.

PUB said the fish are likely to have been washed up into Sungei Api Api by the tide.

Some residents said they noticed the fishy smell around 3pm.

Some residents were bothered by the smell, while others described it as being nothing more than just being in a fish market.

Still, many were surprised, saying it was the first time they have seen such happening.

The river is not linked to the area’s water supply, but is commonly used for recreational activities such as canoeing and fishing.

PUB assures the public the incident has no impact on drinking water quality.

The National Environment Agency (NEA) is also investigating the cause of the incident.

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  1. […] Thousands of dead white fish washed up in Singapore Photo: Green Drinks Singapore […]



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  • About Green Drinks Singapore

    Founded in November 2007, Green Drinks Singapore is one of more than 800 cities with a Green Drinks presence.

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